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S.I.F. draft response to Island Bill

Island Bill S.I.F.  Draft response

Islands (Scotland) Bill – call for evidence

Draft 31 August 2017

  1. The Bill creates a duty to publish a national islands plan and lay it before the Scottish Parliament. What are your views on this provision?

We believe that the duty to publish a national islands plan will be a positive milestone. The commitment to ensuring that the progress of the plan is monitored on an annual basis should increase responsibility and transparency, sustain momentum and provide assurance that the unique situation of islands maintains a high profile.

The National Islands Plan will set out the main objectives and strategy in relation to improving outcomes for island communities:

  • We would caution against the Plan being too prescriptive and detailed as to add another layer of bureaucracy. It should have flexibility to react to changing needs, more autonomy, set out a vision for the next 5 years and how it will be achieved.
  • For the Plan to meet the needs of island communities we believe that island communities themselves must be able to build and influence it and be engaged in the monitoring of its progress/or the national plan should be about trends and aspirations with the detail being left to communities to build?
  • It should include a strong commitment to subsidiarity – what means and support will there be to ensure that local decision making and engagement extends to island communities as well as their Local Authority.   While Community Planning Partnerships may seem to already facilitate this, in our experience CPP’s are not always effective in giving communities a voice. If the Convention of Highlands and Islands is the body used to bring in the islands’ voice, we feel that there should be a mechanism to involve grassroot representation on that body, including the Scottish islands Federation.
  • What evidence will be provided to satisfy the Scottish Government that views from island communities have been sought, included and acted upon?
  • As a result of community ownership of assets, some island communities are driving innovation and change and the plan must enable their empowerment even further. Alongside this, it is important to ensure that those islands that perhaps do not yet have that core capacity are still able to be involved.
  • The plan should be underpinned by a new territorial cohesion policy for Scotland, which would adopt the principle enshrined by Articles 170 and 174 of the TFEU, in their references to the requirements on member states to link island, landlocked and peripheral regions with the central regions of the Union (Article 170) and the identification of the need to pay particular attention to regions which suffer from permanent natural or demographic handicaps such as island regions (Article 174). The principles of the Smart Islands Declaration – which were supported by North Ayrshire, Highland, Argyll and Bute and Shetland Islands Councils – should also inform the plan, by acknowledging the islands’ potential to become Smart Islands, that is to say insular territories that embarks on a climate resilient pathway, combining climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts, in order to create sustainable local economic development and a high quality of life for the local population by implementing smart and integrated solutions to the management of infrastructures, natural resources and the environment as a whole, supported by the use of ICT, all the while promoting the use of innovative and socially inclusive governance and financing schemes.
  • While it is called a ‘National’ plan, it must reflect the difference between Scotland’s islands.
  • We would like to see the plan go further to include the establishment of an islands desk/department within Scottish Government. Over the next few years the islands will be amongst the hardest hit communities in the UK as a result of leaving the EU – we need people in place and joined-up thinking to ensure ambitions can still be realised, particularly in the fields of Renewable Energy and carbon reduction.
  • In order to measure success effectively we believe there needs to be a piece of work to establish key baseline data for each island as island statistics are currently patchy and inconsistent. Some the islands which are part of mainland NUTS3 classification are not even singled out and are to all intent and purposes invisible.
  • Will the resources be in place to allow the plan to make a difference?
  1. The Bill will require Scottish Ministers and certain Scottish public authorities, to prepare island impact assessments. Do you agree with this provision? How do you think it should work in practice?

We very much welcome the commitment to the principle of island-proofing as a duty to have regard to island communities. We feel it should be a legal duty and mandatory throughout government. Such a duty should encompass the principles articulated in Articles 170 and 174 of the Lisbon Treaty, which acknowledge the permanent geographical constraints of island territories and their difficulties in accessing the market.

The Islands Bill is the perfect opportunity to address problems by allowing greater flexibility to meet specific island needs but how it should work in practice is difficult to visualise without examples.

Points we consider important include:

  • Island Proofing means assessing policy options to ensure that optimal solutions to our islands areas are applied at all stages of policy development – but most importantly at the earliest stages – taking account of equity and equality issues, by: a) assessing the evidence of specific islands’ needs and circumstances at the start of designing a policy; b) considering the options for fair impacts on the ground in islands areas; and, c) where appropriate, adjusting policies or delivery..
  • Island proofing ought to make government more effective and more efficient and help achieve good economic, environmental and social solutions contributing to growth.
  • Island proofing should therefore be extended to all bodies with island functions and services, including utilities companies, communications providers and regulatory bodies such as OFGEM and all statutory and regulatory bodies with influence over the islands. Island proofing of the way National policies are applied ought to make them more accessible to islands: for example local food production would benefit of local abattoirs, and this may require special derogations. In terms of energy efficiency and fuel poverty, it is important that programmes are island proofed to fit locality and circumstances and acknowledge that island renewables allows production of clean electricity, which should count in terms of de-carbonisation, instead of being penalised as in Orkney. In terms of waste, the higher cost of transport to islands should be considered, as well as the burden of having to get rid of marine plastics. Distance to Market and transport integration are also aspects that need to be taken into consideration.
  • Targeted support to mitigate islands impacts may be needed. Island proofing funding would ensure that the reality of life in remote islands and the higher cost of service delivery is taken into account.
  • The “one size fits all” approach to Planning is detrimental to the islands, and island proofing should provide an opportunity to consider how the Planning function is delivered in an islands’ context.
  • With regards to the specific question of island impact assessment, we agree that a duty should be placed on relevant authorities to undertake an impact assessment when developing, redeveloping and delivering a policy, strategy or service, if it is anticipated to have a significantly different effect on an island community compared with other communities (including other island communities).
  • It is not clear to us however how an island impact assessment will be triggered. Will they be engaged in the assessment? Will island communities have a right to request an assessment? Will island communities even be in the position of knowledge to enable them to request an assessment i.e. will communities be aware of a potential impact before an assessment is triggered?
  • Adequate monitoring of commitments to island proofing will be necessary to ensure that it not just a paper exercise. The bill should detail how this will be done.
  • While it is clear that an island impact assessment will be an important tool in considering the impact on islands we feel that on its own it does not encompass the meaning we believed is behind island proofing. There are many instances of current policy and legislation that would benefit from a review with an island proofing eye.
  • In conclusion, rather than a distant tick box exercise to assess impact, island proofing needs to include the small things as well as the big, to be meaningful to people living on the islands. It needs to offer a new flexibility to be able to adapt things and try new ways of working that will suit an island setting, it needs to be a positive and wider thing, it should embed island issues rather than simply consulting on them. As well as consider impact, it should assess need and enable and drive opportunity. Bill detail proposals for island communities to ensure that island-proofing is effectively implemented and is making a measurable and meaningful difference to communities.
  1. The Bill proposes to protect the Scottish Parliamentary constituency boundary of Na h-Eileanan an Iar (the Western Isles) from change. Do you agree with this?

Yes.

  1. The Bill proposes to make an exception to the rules for local government electoral wards to allow areas with inhabited islands to return 1 or 2 members (instead of the usual 3 or 4). What are your views on this proposal?

We agree that the current system is unfair – for instance, Cumbrae and Arran are not represented by their own member because there is a perception that their combined population is too small. We therefore agree that there should be the flexibility to have 1 or 2 member wards.

However the challenge of finding a representative and meeting the administrative requirements for islands with a small population that struggle with representation – should not be overlooked in the planning of mechanisms and resources needed to deliver.

 

  1. The Bill will provide a regulation-making power for the Scottish Ministers to create a marine licensing scheme for coastal waters. Do you agree with this power? Do you have any comments on how it should be used?

We do agree with the power and feel that island councils should have more power and influence over and benefit from marine development as should island communities themselves and we would therefore welcome a real commitment to subsidiarity.

There should be provision to enable the revenue from Crown Estate marine assets to be invested in the islands – island communities depend on the surrounding shore and sea for many needs, yet currently they have no influence over development and have to pay the Crown to be able to use their own asset.

We believe aquaculture should be included. While valuable jobs can be created, the impact should also be considered via island-proofing.

The regulation should be more flexible to enable influence over decisions outwith 12 nautical miles where there is shore-based activity and therefore an impact on the islands.

  1. Does the Bill achieve its aims and are you in favour overall? Is there anything else that you feel should be included or excluded from the Bill?

It is not quite clear how the Bill will actually address the challenges, realise the potential and empower island communities. How will it support sustainable, permanent communities on inhabited islands?

The Plan sets the vision and the impact assessments will consider the effect on islands. Will it be backed by investment and action that will tackle the big issues such as fuel poverty, cost of living, health provision, service retention, lack of housing for young people, population decline, connectivity? What will actually be done to create the level playing field and parity that is needed for islands to flourish?

  1. Do you have any comments on the bill in relation to human rights or equalities?

While the challenges of island life are recognised, there is often a presumption held that islanders should just get on with it as it is their own choice to live on an island. People living on the islands accept that there will never be the number or choice of things available to them as in an urban area but strongly believe that they should expect an equal level of service for the essential things in life such as medical treatment, education, power, fuel, waste, connectivity and that the over-cost of island life due to transport should never be underestimated and always be taken into account.

COMMENTS:

 

1/ Thomas Fisher, Young Start Project Leader
Mentor Uist and Barra — supporting young people aged 16 to 24
Cothrom Ltd, 01878 700918 (direct) or 700910
https://www.facebook.com/CothromLearningCentre/

There is little I would disagree with in your draft response to the Islands Bill.

My first main point relates to an overall framework of thinking about our islands.  Yes, the bill has been introduced to address the huge challenges of island life.  Just as important is to recognise the huge assets that islands have (land, community, people, enterprise, social enterprises stronger on the islands than on the mainland, etc.).  I would prefer a response that began with these assets, and then said that the bill needs to be about releasing the potential of these assets.  At one point you clearly do this:

“There should be provision to enable the revenue from Crown Estate marine assets to be invested in the islands – island communities depend on the surrounding shore and sea for many needs, yet currently they have no influence over development and have to pay the Crown to be able to use their own asset“.

We have to pay to use our own assets, rather than being able to use them ourselves for our own economic and community benefit!  This is surely the next step for community ownership of land.

So, much of island proofing is actually about releasing the constraints that hold back our islands: the crown estate; the electricity charging framework that prices electricity according to distance from urban centre and thus makes the abundant renewable energy assets uneconomic; the lack of connectivity, preventing people running internet based businesses from choosing to settle on wonderful islands with all their potential (as a related example, look at how our North Uist medical practice is advertising for GPs: http://ruralgp.com/2017/08/vacancy-north-uist-scottish-hebrides-gp/).

My second main point is to reinforce the democratic deficit.  Island communities have shown beyond any doubt that they are very capable of governing themselves (more than two thirds of people in the Outer Hebrides living on community owned land, Eigg, Gigha, Westray, etc.)  We need more control and influence on anything that affects our island life.  There should be a presumption in the bill that any new policies should increase our control and influence.

Here are a few additional comments:

Yes, the bill should include a focus on utilities and other commercial bodies.  These have such a huge influence on island economies (e.g. fuel costs, renewables, broadband, etc.).  Island proofing, for example, would not allow OFGEM’s current pricing regime for electricity generation (I realise that OFGEM is British wide, but it is a striking example).

I would also like to see organisations, not just BT and others, but including charities and social enterprises, that take government funding to deliver a Scottish wide service demonstrate how they are doing this.  The number of websites of such organisations I have been to that claim they serve all of Scotland, but when you call them up, they say delivering the service, or even coming to visit the islands, is too expensive.  On their side, the Scottish government would have to recognise that additional costs to make the service available to remote islands are legitimate, and must not disadvantage bids in competitive tendering.

Recognising the additional costs of delivering services to remote islands with highly dispersed populations is of course essential for all services, public, private and third sector.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kirkwall, Shapinsay and North Ronaldsay: S.I.F. AGM 2017

 S.I.F. AGM to take place alongside ESIN AGM and Conference in Kirkwall this September

The Scottish Islands Federation will be hosting the European Small Islands Federation AGM and annual Conference in partnership with the Orkney International Science Festival from 11 to 13 September 2017.

From Island produce branding to sustainable transport and Community Renewable energy

The event will include a study visit featuring the culture and archeology of the Orkney with a discussion on island product branding on Monday 11, a study visit to Shapinsay on Tuesday 12 with a smaller group heading to North Ronaldsay, and 3 presentations on the theme of greening  the islands as part of the Orkney International Science Festival on Wednesday 13 September. Of particular importance to the Scottish Islands will be the last session, featuring Brendan Devlin, special advisor to DG Energy, who will present the Clean Energy EU Islands strategy agreed on in Malta last May.  Kostas Komninos from Greece, Elvira Laneborg from Sweden and Mark Hull from Scotland will also present initiatives showing how European islands ‘ smart approach to Energy from transport to renewables production places them as leaders in  sustainable development.

Good attendance from Scottish and European islands

Ireland, France, Sweden, Estonia, Finland and Sweden islands will be represented at the event, with delegates from Eigg, Cumbrae, Luing, Bute, Mull, Barra, Fetlar and several Orkney island Development trusts attending as well.

You can see the full programme here.

S.I.F. Draft response to Island Bill to be approved at the S.I.F. AGM.

An important part of the S.I.F. AGM will be for the delegates to look over the S.I.F. draft response, add to it if necessary and approve it for submission to the Scottish Government in time for the 25 September deadline.

The S.I.F. AGM will take place at 18.45 at the Kirkwall Hotel, Harbour St, Kirkwall, KW15 1LE

S.I.F. AGM Agenda

  1. Apologies
  2. Minutes of last AGM held in Seil
  3. Chair’s report
  4. Treasurer’s report and appointment of auditors
  5. Membership subscriptions
  6. Board elections
  7. Island Bill, discussion of draft SIF response
  8. AOB

 More directors wanted!

With 2 board members standing down , but up for re-election, S.I.F. is looking for up to 4 more directors to take the organisation forward. Help us make the island voice even stronger!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EU Cohesion Policy translated into UK policy: more S.I.F. Brexit questions! into

Do we have a UK Cohesion Policy equivalent to the EU Cohesion Policy?

No we haven’t, says S.I.F. Chair Camille Dressler,  and there has been so far no evidence that any thought has been devoted to that part of EU policy which has been fundamental in ensuring island sustainable development throughout the EU. Are there any thought of developing an equivalent Policy? What happens to Article 174 of th Lisbon Treaty which underpins much of the principles that have informed the Cohesion Policy? Is that going to be repatriated? We fear it won’t as the UK government paid precious little attention  to it when it was an integral part of the EU!

Post 2020 Cohesion Policy has been the subject of much discussion in  the past few months at many different levels. Yet, unsurprisingly,  there has been little about it in the media.  So with this concern in mind, these are the questions we asked MPs Ian Blackford and Stephen Gethins, and now they want to discuss this further!

S.I.F. letter to MPs Ian Blackford and Stephen Gethins

In the context of the UK Brexit negociations, the Scottish Islands Federation is extremely concerned that the Joint Ministerial Committee approach agreed on by the UK Government has thus far produced no tangible results with regards to the differentiated solution proposed by the Scottish Government, which would have secured access to the Single Market for Scotland’s islands.

  • Concerns about EU Cohesion policy.

Scottish Islands Federation’s members have expressed dismay and worry regarding the move away from the EU Cohesion Policy with its associated structural funds and the CAP for the islands.

We would therefore like to stress how important the EU Cohesion Policy has been for the islands. Its stated aim being to improve the economic well-being of regions in the EU and also to moderate regional disparities, it has been geared towards making regions more competitive, fostering economic growth and creating new jobs. It also has had an important role to play addressing important wider challenges such as climate change, sustainable energy supply and globalisation.

More than one third of the EU budget is currently devoted to this policy, which aims to remove economic, social and territorial disparities across the EU. Crucially, through Article 174 of the Lisbon Treaty, the policy recognizes inherent and permanent geographical challenges faced by islands.

With a GDP of 75 to 90% of the EU average, the Highlands and Islands have had ‘transitional region’ status. This has enabled the area to benefit from a whole suite of European funds targeted at social and community projects, infrastructure, businesses, partnerships and future proofing measures, including investment in renewable energy projects.

  • CoR and EESC recommendations on islands issues

This spring, both the Committee of the Regions and the European Economic and Social Committee have published recommendations on the issues of island entrepreneurship and the situation of islands in the current and future EU regional policy post-2020.

Islands should be a particular focus of post-2020 cohesion policy, by adding islands as an additional category in the EU Regulation on territorial typologies

Set up a one-stop shop for the islands (“Island Desk”) within the DG REGIO at the European Commission

Establish a system of operating assistance for island businesses to offset higher transport costs, by updating guidelines on regional aid and the GBER

Set up a programme to stimulate innovation processes in island economies, make use of local resources, provide support for the use of renewable energies, handle waste, manage water, promote cultural and natural heritage, and establish a circular economy

All island regions and island Member States to be considered as less developed regions in post-2020 cohesion policy

Include insularity clauses in all key EU legislation, to take specific island circumstances into account

  • Clean Energy EU islands declaration

Last May, the EU commission issued the Clean Energy EU islands declaration informed by the European Parliament’s resolution on the special situation of islands (2015/3014(RSP) stressing the European islands’ potential to contribute to strengthening sustainable development in the Union, which will promote and support tailor-made clean energy transitions for islands.

We are therefore very clear about what the islands of Scotland will miss out on through Brexit.

  • Concerns regarding current approach to negotiations

In this context, we are seeking assurances and clarifications as to how the transition from EU funding to UK funding will be managed to safeguard the fragile economies of the islands and avoid real risks of depopulation, and what measures is the UK government prepared to take to mitigate the loss of opportunities currently being developed within the EU for the islands.

The response by Mr Davis to the differentiated solution proposed by the UK government leads to us to fear that such fundamental aspects of structural development policy, as represented by the EU territorial Cohesion Policy, are being ignored or side-lined through their rejection of Scotland’s proposed access to the Single Market.

This gives the Scottish Islands little confidence in the UK Government’s understanding of issues concerning the islands’ economic survival once EU funding will cease.

We would like in particular to seek clarity on if and how the recognition of the islands’ peripheral and fragile status by the Lisbon Treaty will be translated into UK law post-Brexit.

  • Our questions:

We seek your response as to the following questions which we submit are fundamental to the continual growth and development of our island region post-Brexit:

  1. What policies if any will be put in place at UK and Scottish level to replace the Cohesion Policy framework
  2. If such policies are to be established, how would the necessary Structural Funds be established and at what level would they be administered?
  3. How would Scotland feed into that process? How would the communities most affected be engaged to support development of policies behind the funds?
  4. How can existing levels of funding be protected?
  5. What measures are the UK Government prepared to take to ensure that cooperation with other EU island regions can continue?
  6. 
 How can the UK government protect unique geographical origins and protected names, such as Scotch Beef and Scotch Lamb? What about Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) and Protected Geographical Indication (PGI), which are of such importance for the islands?
  7. What assurance can the UK Government give that any new policy framework for Scottish farmers and crofters (direct payments and rural development measures) will be adequately funded and will take into consideration the special situation of island agriculture?
  8. How is the UK Government planning to ensure that environmental protection which is crucial to the sensitive and fragile environment of Scotland’s islands will be continued?
  9. What about the 2020 goals and commitments to lowering carbon consumption, notably through production of renewable energy?
  10. We are concerned that the Scottish islands lead in renewable energy production may be further eroded and hampered as shown already by the lack of support for the shovel ready projects of Remote Island Wind in the Northern and Western Isles.

We look forward to receiving your response on how you as an MP will seek to mitigate the effects of a move away from the EU Territorial Cohesion policy. This would have the potential to starve the islands of crucial economic and social support, jeopardize their fragile and precious environment and hamper their development and aspirations for decades to come.

Furthermore, we welcome any queries or discussions you may wish to undertake with us to ensure the success of future policies, which will directly affect the Scottish island regions as well as other islands in the UK.

 

 

 

Proposal for an international Small Island terroir brand

Island Specialties® – a transnational and internationally appreciated terroir brand?

Danish Island food producer Laurids Sig Christensen thinks that  island produce need to be have their own internationally recognised brand:”Island Specialties® ”

Unique island aspects

Islands often have unique natural conditions of food production and these conditions potentially result in unique products and unique qualities in products. Therefore, food producers on small islands have unique conditions to comply with the terroir concept and unique conditions to contribute to diversification in food qualities and methods of food production adapted to the nature of these locations.

Collective marketing impact

Island communities generally have strong identity, and they have a strong appeal to the outside world in many – if not all countries. The reason why a terroir brand was developed in Denmark and the perspective of developing it into an internationally recognized brand was about developing collective impact in marketing. See how the Danes did it  here.

A large number of island brands already exists, some of which are very strong. Developing collective impact in marketing is not an alternative to these marketing platforms – the perspective is to develop synergy between island brands already existing. To develop collective impact in marketing of products from small island communities requires that there is a general understanding and acceptance of the value of doing so.

Mapping production potential in small island communities

“First of all,  it would be good to discuss and ultimately develop definitions of what a small island is in a European context’ proposes Laurids. ” What is the size limits of a small island and what is the size limits of small island communities?  It might be difficult to reach a consensus for all countries in Europe but if we could reach common definitions for a substantial number of countries it would still be worth the effort!”

Exploring international marketing perspectives

The next step might be to discuss perspectives and interest in concerted marketing efforts, i.e. presentation on international food exhibitions, targeting specific markets such as Japan and the USA.

Small island food producers in Denmark did go to Japan, and the interest in Japan was extraordinary. However, more strength is needed to penetrate and actually get our products on the Japanese market.

Together we can do it better than individually!

Laurids wants to hear from you. You can contact him through us at info@scottish-islands-federation.co.uk

Scotland’s Place in Europe, what now?

Ignored and sidelined: Scotland’s position on a differentiated solution

“ The things we stand to lose though leaving the EU membership and the Single Market are all things that we value and we do not want to lose them, so we will look very carefully at all the options presented in order to keep as many of the benefits of EU membership as we can.”

This was the general response to our questions last January. 

Article 50 has been triggered and the UK Government is still ignoring the statements in the Scottish Government’s paper three months after its publication.

Michael Russell’s demand to have Scotland’s proposals for a differentiated solution included in the letter sent to Donald Tusk was equally ignored.

Devolved matters now under threat

The report by the Commons Committee  on Exiting the EU  concluded that the Prime Minister will attempt to use Brexit to rewrite the devolution settlement and reserve the power to legislate in future on Scottish agriculture payments, fisheries quota and renewable energy targets.

The Scottish Government’s responses to the S.I.F. ‘s  questions are therefore now rendered utterly meaningless.

Will the devolved legislatures’ views be considered ?

The  Commons Committee  on Exiting the EU recommended that the views of the Weslh, Scottish and Norther Irish Legislatures regarding their option papers should be considered as a matter of urgency.

Considering that the White Paper for the Great Repeal Bill wants to bring back all the powers vested in the EU to Westminster,  to ensure the effective functioning of the UK Single market, its effect will be to breach the founding  principles of devolution of the 1998 Scotland Act.

It thus looks increasingly unlikely that the devolved legislatures’ views will be considered to the extent wished by the Scottish Government in any case.

The Scottish government will be unlikely to  be in a position to negociate or protect the islands’ interests as it stated it would.

Island Farming and crofting, Environment, Renewable Energy,  EU cooperation?

 It is very hard to see how the Scottish Government  will now be able to negotiate with the UK Government to ensure that future financial support for initiatives that currently receive European funds is allocated on a fair and equitable basis across the UK. Looking for  more devolved powers to come to Scotland is going to be very  difficult if not impossible.

Independence? The only way forward to safeguard the Scottish islands’ economic well-being

S.I.F.’ will continue their dialogue with Michael Russell MSP  and his team  as the Brexit negotiations unfold.

But since it is very unlikely that the UK government will change its position, it does increasingly appear that the only way forward to safeguard the islands’ economy and realise their renewable energy potential is to pursue independence and stay withing the EU.

 

 

Smart Island Initiative is live

The Smart Island Initiative is live!

 

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The Smart Islands Initiative advocates for a holistic development approach one that “derives from insularity, the condition that forces island authorities to focus on how to ensure the optimal use and management of their resources and infrastructures, very often within island boundaries, in order to support sustainable and equitable economic development that fully taps into islands’ local potential (geography, natural and human resources, products)”

#NEWS 1: We have a website http://www.smartislandsinitiative.eu, FB and Twitter account. Please spread the news!!!

#NEWS 2: The highlight of the Smart Island Declaration event on the 28 March in Brussels is that we expect European Commissioner for Climate and Energy Miguel Arias Cañete to open the Smart Islands Declaration and address the signing ceremony!

#VERY IMPORTANT . We now have 200 organisations and Local authorities throughout the EU who have signed up to the Initiative  and plan to attend the Brussels event. This is good news as the  European Commission is promoting a programme for sustainable energy on islands to be announced by the end of 2017. This means funds for islands!!!

In this context, the Commission sees the Smart Island Initiative in a very positive way because this is 1) European and 2) bottom-up. 1+2 are key ingredients for the Commission programme to be successful. The synergies are there, waiting to be exploited!

#SMART ISLAND INITIATIVE SCOTLAND. Most Local Authorities with islands responsibilities have signed up to the initiative: Highland, Argyll and Bute, North Ayrshire have send letters of support with Shetland Islands Council leading the way by signing the Declaration itself! Island Development trusts that have benefited from European funding for their renewable energy scheme like the Isle of Eigg Heritage Trust have also send letters of support.  Likewise,  Renewable Energy Academic bodies  Strathclyde University and NGOs like Community Energy Scotland have also given their support alongside the Scottish Islands Federation and the European Islands Federation (ESIN) . 

Islands must be at the heart of the EU Cohesion Policy

To be an island should not be a problem but a pillar of development!

This was the strong message delivered by CPMR President  Vasco Cordeiro (and President of Azores Government)  on 9 March 2017.  He also said: “we must speak very clearly and very loudly about the islands’ needs.”

The CPMR Island Commission’s AGM 2017 was hosted on Gozo, Malta’s smaller island, and brought together island regions from the North to the South of Europe to look at the future of Cohesion Policy post-2020.

Islands must think globally and act locally

As an observer member, the European Small Islands Federation, represented by its chair, Camille Dressler, also chair of the Scottish Islands Federation,  was extremely pleased to see some very strong principles being reiterated by the  minister for Gozo in particular

  • Islands must think globally and act locally
  • One size does not dictate all nor add value to a nation.
  • It is important to bridge the gap between the EU and policies
  • It is crucial to get rid of bureaucratic barriers and help micro, small and medium size enterprises through changes to State Aid rules for islands and a rise in De minimis level at least in line with inflation.
  • The Cohesion Policy, as a fundamental pillar of EU construction, must act as a forward looking policy bringing EU citizens together
  • There must be a new way to look at shipping issues
  • There should be social policies for the islands
  • There should be special funding packages for the islands
  • To serve the islands adequately, there must be a place-based approach to the EU Development and Territorial Cohesion Policy.

 

The future of the EU and the islands

Eleni Marianou, the CPMR islands Commission secretary, was very clear on what had to be done in response to Mr Juncker’s White paper:

  • The CPMR needs to make a response to the EU White Paper and respond to the key challenges of competitiveness, investment and Territorial Cohesion.
  • It needs a strong voice and think of target audiences: EU institutions, National governments, EU Regions, Citizens and Young People.
  • Response includes making the case for EU cooperation based on CPMR principles of balanced Territorial Principles, solidarity between the EU and its regions, championing the position of regions in EU policy-making.
  • CPMR needs to prepare for a strong lobbying campaign prior to and during the EU parliamentary elections in 2018- 2019

 The islands’s access to the Single Market is not  equal to that of other regions.

The presentation by Ioannis Spillanis from the University of Aegean Island and Local development laboratory made the following points:

  • 3.4 %of EU population live on islands. Their access to the Single market is NOT equal to the access enjoyed by other parts of the EU.
  • Insularity has a negative aspect on businesses and people and Brexit will make it worse by reducing the number of islands in the EU and the overall funding share.
  • EU Sectoral policies are without differentiation
  • For the islands to realise their potential, EU policies need to include insularity clauses.
  • For this reason, a new island typology is needed. Current indicators are woefully inadequate: new indicators are required to describe the islands situation as the classification used in NUTS2 and NUTS3 is not good enough. (NUTS 3 islands are drowned in the NUTS2 areas)
  • To achieve the EU’s principles of Territorial Cohesion and Sustainability, the development model needs to be changed to include Equal opportunities for the islands and Green island policies.

Entreprise on islands  needs an  innovative approach from the EU

INSULEUR president Georgios Benetos showed how islands are left behind from the business point of view:

  • No economy of scale for the islands
  • Added costs of insularity need to be taken into account
  • Access to credit and finance is more complicated on islands

Fundamental changes in the way the EU could support the islands:

  • VAT should be lower as it is already on some islands (Corsica, Heligoland) whereas there is no VAT in the Faroe islands.
  • There should be a lower level of taxation for islands to help small and medium enterprises as well as micro-enterprises.

Islands need support as well as a Can Do approach

MEP Myriam Dalli  who is involved in supporting Blue Growth projects, agreed  that  islands do need support, and the way to get it was to demonstrate a Can Do approach.

Islands at the forefront of renewable revolution

The presentation by the Western Isles Council showed how the islands could become Energy Positive Islands by investing in their potential for renewables. Bornholm ‘s vice mayor presented the island Bright Green Future.  Kostas Komninos built on that concept by presenting the Smart Island Initiative to be launched in Brussels on 28 March.

Corsica to lead on post 2020 negotiations and insularity clause

Gilles Simeoni, President of the Executive Council of Corsica, was unanimously elected as President of the CPMR Islands Commission (CPMR-IC).

Following his election, President Simeoni said: “The months and years to come will be decisive not only for our islands but also for Europe, in the context of a very marked internal and international crisis”.

He identified the need to put islands at the heart of Cohesion Policy and suggested that an insularity clause should appear in transport, tax policies, waste management and energy.

From a purely Scottish Point of view, it was gratifying to discuss with Mr Simeoni how the Corsican team had come to Scotland to meet with Cal Mac to look at the way they are structured and with a view to replicate the C-Mal and Cal Mac model!

The CPMR IC position 

The CPMR Islands Commission, which represents all of Europe’s island regions, has reiterated that islands and outermost regions are unique because of their remoteness.

The Islands Commission has called for the termination of the traditional perception that islands are too different from one another to justify policy measures at EU level.

While debate on post-2020 policies is emerging, island regions across Europe have called for the EU to develop a strong post-2020 Cohesion Policy with a robust territorial dimension which would earmark specific funding to assist island and outermost regions reach the EU objectives.

The CPMR-IC would welcome a constructive dialogue with the European Commission in 2017 ahead of the legislative proposals for post-2020 Cohesion Policy.

Furthermore, it has urged the European Institutions to correct the glaring exclusion of islands from the legal recognition of different territorial typologies that is currently being debated.

Click here to access the speeches and presentations made at the Gozo 2017 AGM.

SG response to S.I.F. Brexit questions

SG responses to our questions

“ The things we stand to lose though leaving the EU membership and the Single Market are all things that we value and we do not want to lose them, so we will look very carefully at all the options presented in order to keep as many of the benefits of EU membership as we can.”

Our questions to the Scottish Government

Policies

  • What policies if any will be put in place at UK and Scottish level to replace the Cohesion Policy framework?
  • If such policies are to be established, how would the necessary Structural Funds be established and at what level would they be administered?
  • How would Scotland feed into that process? How would the communities most affected be engaged to support development of policies behind the funds?
  • We are not convinced the UK government has an interest in developing a cohesion policy that will be comprehensive enough to take into account Scottish islands’ needs or issues facing any peripheral area in Scotland. Is there appetite within the Scottish Government to challenge the UK Government on the crucial issue of Cohesion Policy replacement?

SG Response:

The Scottish Government supports the principles and benefits that underpins EU membership it and is looking at ways to continue with it.  As expressed in the document “Scotland’s place in Europe”, the Scottish Government is committed to remain in the European Single Market, and this has been ratified by the Scottish Parliament’s vote on 17 January.

“ The things we stand to lose though leaving the EU membership and the Single Market are all things that we value and we do not want to lose them, so we will look very carefully at all the options presented in order to keep as many of the benefits of EU membership as we can.”

Structural funds

  • How can existing levels of funding be protected?
  • What will be asked of the UK Government in this respect?
  • What funding guarantees can the Scottish government ask or provide?

SG response: The Scottish Government is very well aware of the issues and aware of the islands’ concerns. “We will do what we can to protect the islands’ interests and we intend to ask all these questions to the UK Government.”

EU Cooperation

  • What measures are the Scottish Government prepared to take to ensure that cooperation with other EU island regions can continue?

SG response: Re EU cooperation, the Scottish Government has shared concerns and intends to do what it can for this to continue.

Island Farming and crofting

  • 
 How can the Scottish government protect unique geographical origins and protected names, such as Scotch Beef and Scotch Lamb? What about Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) and Protected Geographical Indication (PGI), which are of such importance for the islands?
  • How can free access to the European Single Market as proposed in “Scotland’s place in Europe” ensure agricultural goods and products are included?
  • What assurance can the Scottish Government give that any new policy framework for Scottish farmers and crofters (direct payments and rural development measures) will be adequately funded and will take into consideration the special situation of island agriculture?

SG response: Post-2020, the UK withdrawal from the EU will have implications for projects currently funded by the EU, and that will impact Scotland.

 The Scottish Government indicated it will negotiate with the UK Government to ensure that future financial support for initiatives that currently receive European funds is allocated on a fair and equitable basis across the UK.

Environment

  • How is the Scottish Government planning to ensure that environmental protection which is crucial to the sensitive and fragile environment of Scotland’s islands will be continued?
  • What about the 2020 goals and commitments to lowering carbon consumption, notably through production of renewable energy? Scotland has already exceeded its targets and has positioned it self as a model of innovative technology in Europe. But we are concerned that the Scottish islands lead in renewable energy production may be further eroded and hampered as shown already by the lack of support for the shovel ready projects of Remote Island Wind in the Northern and Western Isles. It is difficult to see how island communities will be able to maintain our lead in innovation and carbon reduction and invest in further renewable energy schemes in the future, if access to EU funds is blocked and the UK government continues to take retrograde steps on renewables.

Local authorities

  • EU laws and regulations impact on many Council services, such as waste, employment, health and safety, consumer protection and trading and environmental standards, all of which affect the islands.
  • How will the Scottish government ensure that regulatory power over such services will not be simply transferred from Brussels to an indifferent Westminster regime?

SG response: re Social policies and environment standards, our concern for Scotland is that these can be maintained, and for these reasons we will look for more devolved powers to come to Scotland.

It is more than likely that constitutional arrangements in the UK post-Brexit will have to change.

See SG paper, Scotland’s place in Europe

As Article 50 is triggered, see S.I.F. ‘s further thoughts on this here.

S.I.F. Briefing: Scottish islands and the impact of Brexit

Scottish Islands and the impact of Brexit

A briefing paper by the Scottish Islands Federation

On 18 January 2017, Camille Dressler S.I.F. chair met with members of the Scotland’s Place in Europe team at Victoria Quay.  This is what she said: ‘The main concern for the Scottish Islands Federation is how the move away from CAP and the EU Cohesion Policy with its associated structural funds will be managed to safeguard the fragile economies of the islands and avoid real risks of depopulation.  ‘

Importance of the EU Cohesion Policy for the islands

  1. The EU Cohesion Policy’s stated aim is to improve the economic well-being of regions in the EU and also to moderate regional disparities. The policy is geared towards making regions more competitive, fostering economic growth and creating new jobs. It also has a role to play addressing important wider challenges such as climate change, sustainable energy supply and globalisation.
  1. More than one third of the EU budget is devoted to this policy, which aims to remove economic, social and territorial disparities across the EU. Crucially, through Article 174 of the Lisbon Treaty, the policy recognizes inherent geographical challenges faced by islands.
  1. In the current 2014–2020 funding period, Cohesion Funds have been allocated between regions that are deemed to be a) “more developed” (with GDP per capita over 90% of the EU average), b) “transition” (between 75% and 90%), and c)”less developed” (less than 75%).
  1. With a GDP of 75 to 90% of the EU average, the Highlands and Islands have ‘transitional region’ status. This has enabled the area to benefit from a whole suite of European funds targeted at social and community projects, infrastructure, businesses, partnerships and future proofing measures, including investment in renewable energy projects.

The European Structural Funds

  1. Through European Structural Funds, the EU Cohesion policy has provided vital funding for Scottish island communities and our neighbouring regions.
  1. In the programming period, 2007-13, Scotland received approximately £680m in Structural funds. About 800 national and local projects were supported. Major strategic projects funded include the Shetland Fibre optic broadband cable, the Lerwick District heating scheme, the Scalpay and Eriskay bridges, and the Loch Carnan wind farm in the Outer Hebrides, as well as harbours and other key infrastructure developments. In Highland, the piers and ferry for the Small Isles were built with the help of EU funds, whilst the electrification of Eigg would not have been possible without £764 000 of ERDF. Flagship cultural projects supported include the Mareel Cultural Centre in Lerwick, the Orkney Theatre, the Scapa Flow Trail, Scotland’s Islands Cultural Programme, Garrenin Museum and Village and improvements to the Callanish Visitor Centre. Structural funds supported training at Calanas Wool Mill in Uist, social enterprise and leadership training throughout the islands, and have delivered benefits for many islanders. Islands have benefited from strategic investment in the University of the Highlands and Islands and the Scottish Investment Bank Loan Fund has helped SMEs across the area.
  1. For the 2014-2020 programming period, increased levels of investment were secured. The European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) and the European Social Fund (ESF) are investing €476m and €464m respectively, including support for a Low Carbon Infrastructure Transition Programme. Some community infrastructure projects on islands have already benefited, notably including Luing’s award-winning Atlantic Islands Centre.
  1. European structural funds have had a positive and progressive impact on small businesses and local communities across Scotland, but can deliver special benefits to islands through their inclusiveness, helping to maintain and enhance the quality of island life.

The Scottish Rural Development Programme:

  1. The Scottish Rural Development Programme (SRDP) channels millions of Euros into the rural economy to help create vibrant rural communities, protect and enhance the environment, encourage rural businesses and support the farming industry to grow and modernise.
  1. Funding for a diverse range of projects may be accessed by individuals, businesses and groups, through grant schemes. A number of these are specifically directed at crofters and farmers, such as the Croft House Grant Scheme, the Crofting Agricultural Grant Scheme, the Small Farms Grant Scheme, the Less Favoured Area Support Scheme, The Scottish Suckler Beef Support Scheme, the Food Processing, Marketing and Co-operation Fund, Young Entrants Scheme and Young Farmers start up funds.
  1. LEADER funding has also been invaluable for the islands, providing a ‘bottom up’ partnership-based approach to rural development.LEADER has supported multi-sectoral, community-based development and helped individuals, communities and businesses come together to design and implement Local Development Strategies. In doing so, LEADER has helped build social as well as economic capital on many Scottish islands.
  1. From 2008, in Argyll and Bute alone, LEADER has funded over £6m to 200 projects, levering over £15m to the area in match funding, thus providing a substantial cash injection to communities in the region including the islands of Mull, Arran & Cumbrae.
  1. There has been real uncertainty over the latest round of LEADER funding (2014-2020). The programme got off the ground very late and is now at risk of being devalued during Brexit negotiations.

Common Agriculture Policy

  1. Support payments derived from the CAP are hugely significant to the viability of Scottish agriculture as the vast majority of farms and crofts remain highly dependent on ‘Pillar 1 direct support payments’. (63% of farmers’ income). Agri-developments are jointly funded by the EU and the Scottish Government under ‘Pillar 2’ schemes.
  1. Maintaining communities through farming and crofting is more significant in Scotland than it is in other parts of the UK and especially so on most Scottish islands.
  2. A small island farm on the Isle of Muck, with 630 ewes and 50 breeding cows on approximately 400 HA, faces challenges typical of other islands in terms of high costs of importing feed (£475 for a lorry’s ferry ticket) and an additional £600 payable for exporting a lorry load of livestock, compared to mainland farmers.
  1. With only a limited number of large agricultural units in Scotland able to show a net profit without agricultural support mechanisms, the fear is that additional costs facing islands could be disastrous in their absence.
  1. The EU’s convergence target of minimum payments of €196 per hectare by 2020 would need to be Scotland’s minimum allocation of direct support funding to deliver parity for equivalent enterprises on similar land types – and so establish a more even playing field, as stated by NFU Scotland. In the context of the UK government’s apparent lack of commitment to agriculture and food security, the fight to retain minimum payments is vital if agriculture in the islands is to remain viable.
  1. Most agricultural activity in the West Highland and Islands centres around production of sheep and cattle. The UK sheep industry is substantially dependent on exports, with something like 60% of UK lamb consumed in mainland Europe.
  2. The nightmare scenario for Scottish beef and lamb producers is that they may have to compete with subsidised European producers, with diminished access to markets and less support. (possible imposed tariff of 20% depending on options). Brexit could potentially decimate Scottish agriculture, and especially island producers, in the absence of other means of financial support coming on stream.

    Local Authorities serving the islands

  3. In spite of budgetary and policy restrictions imposed by central government, some local authorities have managed to pursue economic development strategies using European structural funds. It is difficult to see how they can continue managing economic expansion without access to such fundMuch legislation affecting local government and requiring local government implementation originates in Brussels. Social and environmental protection, health and consumer protection, working time directives, the transfer of undertakings, procurement and state aid, transport policies, and rural and maritime policies are among the many areas affected by the EU.

 

  1. The high quality of the natural environment is of particular importance to islands, in terms of food production, tourism and the local quality of life. Scottish and European sustainability agendas generally accord well with island interests whereas the UK government’s approach to environmental priorities can tend to be at odds with insular perspectives.
  1. Many islanders fear that Brexit will reduce investment of resources in environmental concerns and bring adverse consequences for Scotland’s islands, especially with diminishing resources available to local authorities. Because of their fragile natural and social environment, the islands will be more vulnerable to a potential hollowing out of environmental and social protection.

EU wide collaboration

  1. The Scottish Islands collaborate with their European counterparts in policy development at various levels. The larger islands are involved in the Island Commission through the Committee for Peripheral and Maritime Regions with local authorities also benefiting from INTERREG cooperation and other opportunities to exchange knowledge and cross-fertilize ideas and actions. Smaller islands are involved too, through existing networks such as the European Small Islands Federation (ESIN). Together they have succeeded in pushing for better recognition of the island situation at European level, culminating in the Island Declaration of February 2016. Years of collaboration between European islands through Islenet, IslePact, and more recently SMILEGOV (Smart Island Governance) have demonstrated that islands can usefully host projects and share valuable transferable knowledge on smart and efficient resource and infrastructure management. The Smart Islands Declaration, scheduled to be launched in spring 2017, is asking for the evident potential of islands as leaders in innovation and renewable energy production to be recognized and resourced by the EU.
  1. There is a real concern about loss of knowledge exchange and collaboration opportunities for islands across Europe on issues of common concern, notably including better management of energy and resources. Scotland’s own Zero Waste island flagship project on Bute would not have been possible without European support and inspiration. Over many years Bute has addressed key themes of waste management and recycling, composting and local food production, community energy, low carbon transport and more. Much of this work has been supported by European funding and in turn, inspired other European islands, creating employment and learning opportunities in the process.

What will happen to the islands post-Brexit?

  1. Leaving the EU means that Scotland’s islands will no longer benefit from established funding avenues and exciting collaboration opportunities. European money has supported rural development on Scottish Islands to a far greater extent than UK government in recent years. Risks to islands’ agriculture and other key sectors are of real concern, with fears urban priorities may now overshadow the needs of Scotland’s more pristine periphery.
  1. Our island economies will need continuing support if our primary industries are to fulfill their potential in the global market place for high quality, value added food & drink. Crucially, Social Enterprise will also require support to plug gaps left in island services by dispassionate market forces.
  1. The overarching danger is that de-population will resume or worsen, leaving populations on islands less able to sustain viable livelihoods.
  1. Some EU funds – such as Horizon 2020 – may be available through partnership and ‘buying in’ either as the UK or Scotland. However, there are no guarantees that islanders will continue to benefit from Europe in the ways we have in recent decades.

31.The proposal published by the Scottish Government in “Scotland’s place in Europe” presents options which are solutions to many issues – in terms of trade, freedom of movement, protections for workers, and environmental standards. It makes an eloquent case for Scotland’s continuing access to the Single Market. However it does not address in full the replacement of those EU funds, which have been so fundamental to sustaining so many of our island communities.

Some islanders’ comments

32.”Islanders are now fearful of their prospects if access to EU structural funds is removed.” Harris

“We would like to ask if there is anything to replace LEADER funding in the future.” Unst

“My job as island development officer is part funded by the EU, how will this continue?” Rum

“The depopulation that’s happened out in these islands – and it’s happened worst in Harris than anywhere in the Outer Hebrides – will just continue to increase.” Harris

“What continued direct support for active farmers and crofters will there be, as this will remain vital to sustain communities?” Eigg

“How will we continue to work with our EU island colleagues on common themes and projects?”

“We will lose out and be left behind.” Tiree

“A substantial number of schemes would never have taken place without EU funding, especially the infrastructure projects which have been completed throughout the Western Isles over the past twenty years or more. Objective One and LEADER funding have financed a large variety of projects, including small renewable schemes.” Carloway, Lewis

“Mull is very dependent on the farming industry, what will happen now?” Mull

“What will happen to replace the current level of EU funding following Brexit? We have concerns about disparities between different regions following BrexitWhat will happen to farming subsidies, fishing quotas, transport/boat service?” Orkney

“The age and condition of the boats (Orkney Ferries) is a source of great concern. The cost of taking a vehicle on the ferry is prohibitive for many. Without EU funding to support improvements, what will happen? Without pressure and funding from the EU, the outer isles of Orkney and elsewhere in Scotland will be left to decline, with the rate of depopulation increasing on all but the largest isles.” Sanday, Orkney.

Our questions to the Scottish Government

  1. “EU funding has got to be replaced to look after these peripheral areas by either the Scottish Government or Westminster”, says Angus Campbell, Leader of Comhairle nan Eileanan Siar. Our questions for the Scottish Government in their current negotiations echo the sentiments of this statement.
  • Policies

34.What policies if any will be put in place at UK and Scottish level to replace the Cohesion Policy framework?

  1. If such policies are to be established, how would the necessary Structural Funds be established and at what level would they be administered?
  1. How would Scotland feed into that process? How would the communities most affected be engaged to support development of policies behind the funds?
  1. We are not convinced the UK government has an interest in developing a cohesion policy that will be comprehensive enough to take into account Scottish islands’ needs or issues facing any peripheral area in Scotland. Is there appetite within the Scottish Government to challenge the UK Government on the crucial issue of Cohesion Policy replacement?
  • Structural funds
  1. How can existing levels of funding be protected?
  1. What will be asked of the UK Government in this respect?
  1. What funding guarantees can the Scottish government ask or provide?
  • EU Cooperation
  1. What measures are the Scottish Government prepared to take to ensure that cooperation with other EU island regions can continue?
  • Island Farming and crofting

42. How can the Scottish government protect unique geographical origins and protected names, such as Scotch Beef and Scotch Lamb? What about Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) and Protected Geographical Indication (PGI), which are of such importance for the islands?

  1. How can free access to the European Single Market as proposed in “Scotland’s place in Europe” ensure agricultural goods and products are included?
  2. What assurance can the Scottish Government give that any new policy framework for Scottish farmers and crofters (direct payments and rural development measures) will be adequately funded and will take into consideration the special situation of island agriculture?
  • Environment
  1. How is the Scottish Government planning to ensure that environmental protection which is crucial to the sensitive and fragile environment of Scotland’s islands will be continued?
  1. What about the 2020 goals and commitments to lowering carbon consumption, notably through production of renewable energy? Scotland has already exceeded its targets and has positioned it self as a model of innovative technology in Europe. But we are concerned that the Scottish islands lead in renewable energy production may be further eroded and hampered as shown already by the lack of support for the shovel ready projects of Remote Island Wind in the Northern and Western Isles. It is difficult to see how island communities will be able to maintain our lead in innovation and carbon reduction and invest in further renewable energy schemes in the future, if access to EU funds is blocked and the UK government continues to take retrograde steps on renewables.
  • Local authorities
  1. EU laws and regulations impact on many Council services, such as waste, employment, health and safety, consumer protection and trading and environmental standards, all of which affect the islands.
  1. How will the Scottish government ensure that regulatory power over such services will not be simply transferred from Brussels to an indifferent Westminster regime?
  • Conclusion
  1. The prospect of Scotland being forced to leave the EU against its will is one which will starve the islands of a crucial economic and social support and potentially jeopardize our fragile and precious environments. This has the potential to hamper the islands’ development and aspirations for decades to come.
  1. On behalf of island communities, the Scottish Islands Federation urges the Scottish Government to consider the particularly serious risks to the economies of islands and our future development prospects posed by this perilous situation. We exhort the Scottish Government to explore all possible avenues, including access to the Single Market, to ensure that these risks are minimized.
  1. In particular, we would like to ask the Scottish Government to consider initiating negotiations on the possibility of setting an Island Convention on the model of the Alpine Convention. Should such a cooperation mechanism be set up before Article 50 negotiations are concluded, this might make it easier for the Scottish Islands to continue their involvement in the move to reduce island carbon emissions and also to benefit from any EU funding streams dedicated to such a programme across all EU island regions. This possibility was strongly suggested by DG Energy at the COP22 in Marrakech in November 2016 and is tabled to be discussed in the spring of 2017 during the Malta presidency of the EU.

Scottish Islands are famously blessed with relatively easy access to a high proportion of Europe’s natural energy resource potential, in trms of summer sunshine hours, winter wind and waves, and year round tides and currents. It is well recognised also that islands may serve as valuable proving grounds and test beds for emergent energy technologies, and also, modes of governance, with our vibrant, visionary and resilient island communities. In this light, S.I.F. remains hopeful that appropriately targeted investment in renewable energy and research and development will yet enable Scottish Islands to prosper as real assets to the Scottish nation, and we like to think, to Europe. Meanwhile, many islanders seriously fear that the UK government may recognise us only as peripheral liabilities post Brexit. We trust the Scottish Government will not let this happen.

 

THE VOICE OF COMMUNITY ORGANISATIONS ON SCOTTISH ISLANDS