Category Archives: island renewables

Orkney’s Big Hit

Orkney’s naval past is very much in the spotlight at the moment.  However its future as a local hydrogen economy is also firmly in focus, with the recent launch of the ‘BIG HIT’ hydrogen project.

This major EU-funded project builds on the CES-led Surf ‘n’Turf project which is creating an opportunity for the community-owned wind turbine on Eday to generate power which would otherwise be impossible owing to the constraints on the Orkney grid. BIG HIT extends this idea to include local members Shapinsay Development Trust along with existing partners EMEC, ITM Power, Orkney Islands Council and Orkney College and new partners from elsewhere in Europe. Surf ‘n’ Turf, funded through the Scottish Government’s Local Energy Challenge Fund is progressing well.

The BIG HIT project in Orkney stands for ‘Building Innovative Green Hydrogen Systems in an Isolated Territory’ and is an EU-funded Horizon 2020 joint project.   The project, led by Aragon Hydrogen Foundation in Spain, sees us partner community member, Shapinsay Development Trust, and other partners, EMEC, Orkney Islands Council, as well as Scottish Hydrogen Fuel Cell Association, ITM (UK) and a number of international partners.

The BIG HIT launch took place in Kirkwall recently and welcomed partners from seven European countries, meeting face-to-face for the first time and hearing how community-owned renewables can produce clean hydrogen for road transport and heating public buildings.

BIG HIT is funded through €5m (around £4m) from the European Commission’s Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Joint Undertaking.  Its aim is to install and demonstrate the viability of a supply chain for hydrogen in an island territory.  Many of the technical challenges in making hydrogen from renewable electricity have already been overcome by Surf ‘n’ Turf, a project in which CES is leading, and has already attracted Scottish Government investment of £1.2m.

Successful end to SMILEGOV project

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SMILEGOV Summary Report for Scottish Island Federation AGM December 2015, Terry Hegarty, SMILEGOV project officer

The Scottish Islands Federation (SIF) has recently completed involvement in a 30 month European project to support more effective approaches to strategic energy planning and development of sustainable energy projects on islands.

The SMILEGOV project’s acronym derives from ‘Smart Islands Governance’, a critical consideration for island communities aspiring to sustainability. The capacity of individual islands to comply with European energy targets widely depends upon collaborative planning and effective participatory engagement of key stakeholders. These typically include agencies of both local and central government, island community and business interests, land owners, energy companies, regulatory bodies and technology specialists.

Scotland offered a distinct model

Elsewhere in Europe, Municipal or Regional Authorities commonly lead development of sustainable energy projects and plans for islands. SIF has thus participated alongside 11 other networks spanning 163 island authorities throughout the Baltic, Mediterranean and Atlantic regions and beyond, nearly all represented by local government personnel. The ‘community NGO’ model for leading developments on Scottish islands with which SIF has worked is quite distinct and evidently of interest to some other consortium members, motivating a study group of Estonian Islanders to visit Mull in June 2015.

Parallel programmes of themed island energy workshops arranged and reported throughout Europe have effectively pooled information, knowledge and perspectives to enhance capacity for development of island energy plans and projects throughout SMILEGOV’s ‘clusters’.

Energy priorities for Islands

Energy priorities facing Islands were identified, drawn together and addressed, through SMILEGOV consultations and reports completed (or in the pipeline):

  • Mobility
  • Communication
  • Business Models
  • New Technologies
  • Smart Grids
  • Permit Processes
Identified constraints

In Scotland constraints facing island energy projects in Scotland notably include:

  • Grid constraints
  • Accessibility of data to inform plans
  • Planning constraints
  • Local capacity to lead developments
  • Consistency of government support
Best practice highlighted

Through SMILEGOV, difficulties, best practice and achievements have also been highlighted. See the SMILEGOV case studies of the project website at www.sustaianbleislands.eu.

SIF worked with Community Energy Scotland (CES) to monitor, support and report on progress of a number of individual energy projects within our cluster of Scottish Islands.

8 energy audits completed for Scottish islands

Inspired by SMILEGOV, and also supported by CES through Local Energy Scotland, SIF initiated a separate project to facilitate Island Energy Audits for participating Scottish islands. Each of eight resulting reports presents useful baseline data to inform more effective approaches to energy planning at island level. Follow up activity is already being pursued in the cases of Iona and The Small Isles

Islands as test beds 

Due to the generic nature of energy challenges facing islands, it is increasingly recognised in Scotland as elsewhere, that islands may serve as valuable test beds for emergent technologies, and proving grounds for more effective multilateral approaches to strategic local energy planning for sustainability.

 

 

Argyll and Bute’s CROP: a successful model

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Argyll and Bute  Community Renewables Opportunity Portal (CROP) now up and running, is providing a really successful model of presentation and integration of renewable energy information for use by community groups.

The CROP pages on the Argyll and Bute website takes you to a well thought out process to help communities identify the right project for them.

From CROP Introduction to CROP Basic, CROP Benefits, CROP  Support to  CROP FAQ, there is plenty of information to get going.

Useful tools on these pages are the matrix which identifies which technologies might be most suited to the community, and the flowchart to help guide communities through the development process which they are considering.

Anaerobic digestion, Wind energy, Biomass, Solar, Heat pumps and Hydro are the main technologies presented, each with their relevant pages.

There is also a comprehensive list of organisations that can help and support, presented in a structured way for easy access. This was very much a result of the CROP consultation, where it became apparent that communities and individuals could get lost in the myriad of advice and guidance on renewable energy already available online.

CROP has  succeeded in  providing quick access to relevant and reliable information for the reader, whether they are new to the topic or not.

 

 

 

 

 

OFGEM consultation on Non Traditional Business Models

OFGEM have just opened a new and important consultation on how they should respond as a regulator to the emergence of ‘Non-Traditional Business Models’ or NTBMs. The consultation will close on  20 May 2015.

OFGEM are saying: “We want to ensure that regulation isn’t getting in the way of organisations delivering desirable consumer outcomes. But, because energy is an essential service, we must also protect the interests of existing and future electricity and gas consumers. And this means we need to understand the benefits, costs and risks of any change to regulation.”
“We have identified four important drivers motivating the emergence of these NTBMs:
• The low carbon transition
• Rapid technological innovation
• Lack of consumer engagement and trust
• Greater focus on affordability and especially on supporting consumers in vulnerable situations. “
“We have grouped these NTBMs into three broad themes:
• Local energy services (eg community energy)
• Bundled services (eg energy service companies)
• Customer participation (eg peer-to-peer energy).
Some NTBMs could also challenge the fundamentals of current regulatory arrangements. For example, some are seeking to generate and supply energy locally, which, at sufficient market penetration, could challenge the centralised way in which the energy market operates.”

Click here for the link to the full consultation document.

 

 

Consultation on the Argyll and Bute Community Renewables Opportunity Plan

Argyll and Bute Council and its partners are currently looking at how they can better assist communities in securing socio-economic benefit from renewables and the development of local renewable projects. To help achieve this, they are now considering the development of a Community Renewables Opportunity Plan (CROP).

This will inform the Argyll and Bute Renewable Energy Action Plan (REAP).  One of the specific areas of focus in the REAP is to assist local communities.

What is the consultation?

To assist in determining the scope and key areas of focus of the CROP Argyll and Bute Council are seeking the communities input and assistance.

“We need communities and groups involved in, or who are considering developing, community renewables to tell us what they need to make it easier for them to progress their projects” says Stuart Green, Senior Development officer at Argyll and Bute. “This might be:

  • better on-line information,
  • information presented in a more user friendly manner,
  • more direct support to communities,
  • advice on feed-in-tariffs and many other issues.

Whatever it is, we need to know in order for your comments and needs to be taken into account when we developing the plan.”

How do  communities take part in the consultation?

Communities can take part through our on-line questionnaire which will be open from 23rd March – 4th May 2012.

The questionnaire is available online and can be downloaded from the Council website at www.argyll-bute.gov.uk/planning-and-environment/community-renewables-opportunity-plan from 23rd March.

For further information please contact: Stuart Green, Senior Development officer, Tel: 01546 604243, Email; stuart.green@argyll-bute.gov.uk